Your Questions About Water Conservation Facts In South Africa

Joseph asks…

Hi, my final review is 50 questions about osmosis/sharks and I need help with 5 of it.?

1. What happens to living potato tissue placed in fresh water and why does that happen?

2. Do potatoes osmoregulate? If so, how?

3. What relationship is there between the size of a shark and where it lives?

4. What relationship is there between the danger to humans and the shark’s habitat?

5. What relationship is between the size of the shark and the types of food it eats?

It would be great if you can include the resources so that I can get more information later. Thanks!

admin answers:

4:The great white shark perhaps more than any other sea creature has captured the imaginations of man, and has become a permanent fixture in popular culture. Certainly most people when thinking of the sea and sea species will immediately conjure an image of a bloodthirsty great white shark in their minds, reminiscent of a scene from Jaws. Most people do not know however the true nature of the great white, and what it is really like as a species, away from the media and the movies.

The one thing that people do know with certainty is that the great white is certainly potentially a very dangerous shark to encounter. Being the largest predatory species of shark in the world, and weighing in at over 6000lbs it is definitely capable of easily killing humans that stray into the water. However despite this there are very few recorded attacks and ever fewer kills by the great white each year, showing that it perhaps isn’t the ruthless killer many believe.

Today the great white is not actually nearly as abundant as wildlife documentaries and shark movies might make you think. Great whites don’t actually reach maturity and being to mate until the age of between 10 and 12 years of age. This means that they are very vulnerable to fishing in their habitats, and sadly their territory is often the same as that of fish such as tuna. As well as this, Great whites are seen by some as the ultimate trophy catch for sport fishermen. This due mainly to their great size and reputation, as well as on screen fame and notoriety.

Another aspect of the relationship between great whites and humans is their role as a tourist attraction in certain areas. Dives in steel cages are organized every day off the coasts of California, South Africa, Mexico and Australia, and prove to be extremely popular. In this respect the sharks are fed, and the tourists are able to come face to face with the sharks in safety, which is something of a mixed bag. The reason being that the sharks associating humans with food isn’t a good thing, although the conservation of the great whites does gain support at the same time.

In fact there are relatively few of the hundreds of species of shark that are a danger to humans. And of those there are only three or four that are actually likely to prey on humans as a first course of action rather than only attacking having been provoked. The great white in fact is the least proficient of the large species of shark that kill humans every year, with tiger, bull and great hammerhead
….This is a whiteshark i searched it up but yea??theres more to it…..all killing more on average.

The majority of great white attacks against humans happen in surfing areas, and are usually directed against swimmers or surfers in fairly shallow water. It is thought that many sharks perceive the shape of a surfboard in the water as being a large fish or seal, which is why they attack. Often once a shark has bitten through a surfboard and found nothing appetizing there, the attack is discontinued and the shark swims away. It is usually only when the shark attacks the board and bites the surfer on board at the same time that the shark attacks further.

Because of the fact that Great whites are so archetypal in most people’s perception of what a shark looks like, other sharks are often misreported as being great whites. This may well be because the great white is a species that everybody knows and has heard of, so when asked “what was it that attacked you?” they reply with, “it was a great white”. When in actual fact the shark is often of a different species altogether.

The majority of the time that great whites are in the same water as humans there is little or no interaction. People generally keeping in water too shallow for the great whites to follow, and not being foolhardy enough to enter waters where there are known to be sharks. When sharks and people do inhabit the same water, great whites will often just leave humans well alone rather than attacking them. The fact is that as prey humans are although not difficult to catch, difficult to kill and get away with it. Being as we are naturally disposed to fight back and try to leave the water as soon as possible, which of course other marine mammals can’t always do as easily.

William asks…

Fascinating facts about South Africa?

I need around 3 fascinating facts about ZA; including things about their culture, lifestyle, animals, language etc etc.
preferably as many as you know
Thanks.

admin answers:

50 Interesting Facts About South Africa1. Table Mountain in Cape Town is believed to be one of the oldest mountains in the world.

2. The world is divided into six floral kingdoms. All these kingdoms encompass several countries, and in some cases, several continents. South Africa, which has a floral kingdom wholly contained within the country, is the one exception. The Cape Floral Kingdom has 9,600 plant species, 70% of which are not found anywhere else in the world.

3. Table Mountain alone has over 1,500 species of plants, more than the entire United Kingdom.

4. South Africa is the second largest exporter of fruit in the world.

5. South Africa has the longest wine route in the world.

6. Kruger National Park supports the greatest variety of wildlife species on the African continent.

7. South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique are tearing down fences between the countries’ game parks to create a 13,500 square mile game park, which will become the largest conservation area in the world. It will be bigger than Switzerland, Belgium or Taiwan.

8. South Africa has a penguin colony, which thrives thanks to the cold Antarctic currents on the west coast near the Cape.

9. South Africa is rated 3rd in the world in supplying safe, drinkable tap water.

10. The Palace of the Lost City resort hotel is the largest theme resort hotel in the world as well as the largest building project undertaken in the southern hemisphere.

11. Walt Disney serves South African wine exclusively at its 73-acre Animal Kingdom Lodge in the United States.

12. South Africa has the cheapest electricity in the world.

13. The deepest mine is a gold mine in South Africa. In 1977 the Western Deep Levels Mine reached a depth of 11,749 feet. Most mines descend to about 3,300 feet.

14. South Africa is the only country in the world to voluntarily abandon its nuclear weapons program.

15. South Africa has 19,004 miles of railway track – 80% of Africa’s rail infrastructure.

16. South Africa generates two-thirds of Africa’s electricity.

17. The Tugela Falls is the second highest waterfall in the world, where the water tumbles down 2,789 feet. First place goes to the Angel Falls in Venezuela at 3,212 feet.

18. Blyde River Canyon is the third largest canyon in the world – and the largest green one. The Grand Canyon in the U.S. Is the biggest, and the Fish River Canyon in Namibia the second, but both are very dry.

19. South Africa is home to the world’s smallest succulent plants (less than 0.39 inches) and the largest (the baobab tree).

20. Kimberley may have the biggest man-made hole in the world, but did you know that the southern Free State town of Jagersfontein has the deepest vertical man-made hole?

21. The only street in the world to house two Nobel Peace prizewinners is in Soweto. Nelson Mandela and Archbishop Desmond Tutu both have houses on Vilakazi Street in Soweto.

22. South Africa is the world’s largest producer of macadamia nuts.

23. South Africa has the third highest level of biodiversity in the world.

24. South Africa is the world’s leader in mining and minerals. It has nearly 90% of the platinum metals on earth, 80% of the manganese, 73% of the chrome, 45% of the vanadium and 41% of the gold.

25. South Africa is the first country in Africa to host the prestigious FIFA World Cup (will take place in 2010).

26. South Africa has the oldest meteor scar in the world, just across the Vaal River near Parys, called the Vredefort Dome. This is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

27. South African grasslands have approximately 30 species per square kilometer, greater than the biodiversity of rainforests.

28. South Africa is the sole producer of the Mercedes Benz C Class, right-hand drive vehicles .

29. General Motors South Africa will be the only manufacturing site outside of the United States to build the Hummer H3 vehicle.

30. South Africa is one of the most generously endowed geographic solar hotspots in the world, soaking up just over half of the world’s highest category of solar wattage per square yard of land.

31. South Africa has deserts, mountains, escarpments, plateaus, grasslands, bush, wetlands and subtropical forests.

32. Most of the world’s proto-mammalian fossils are found in the Karoo region.

33. Dr. Christiaan Barnard, at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, performed the first human heart transplant in the world in 1967. He was also the first to do a “piggyback” transplant in 1971, and he was the first to do a heart-lung transplant.

34. The vast majority of South African coal exports are shipped through the Richards Bay Coal Terminal (RBCT). With the capacity to export 79.4 mmst annually, RBCT is the world’s largest coal export facility.

35. The world’s largest diamond was the Cullinan Diamond, found in South Africa in 1905. It weighed 3,106.75 carats uncut. It was cut into the Great Star of Africa, weighing 530.2 carats, the Lesser Star of Africa,

Helen asks…

Whats the difference between Cheetahs.jaguars and leopards and pathers???? they all look the same??

im studying them but i cant tell the difference between the 4 they all look the same

admin answers:

There may be a superficial resemblance between these animals, especially leopards and jaguars, but it’s actually fairly easy to tell them apart once you know what to look for.

Leopards (Panthera pardus) are found in Asia and Africa. They are the fifth largest members of the cat family, weighing up to 200lb. They are excellent climbers and often take their kills into trees to keep them out of reach of other predators. In comparison with jaguars, they are smaller and less powerfully-built, with proportionally longer legs and tail and a narrower head. Their spots are arranged in small rings.

Leopard image:
http://workstreaminc.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/08/29/leopard.jpg

Jaguars (Panthera onca) are the third largest cats, weighing a maximum of 350lb. They are found in South and Central America (recently a few individuals have even been caught on camera-traps in the extreme southern US). They love water and often hunt fish and turtles. Jaguars are bigger and more heavily-built than leopards, with proportionately shorter legs and tail and a broader head. The spots are arranged in large, blotchy rosettes.

Jaguar image:
http://animals.timduru.org/dirlist/jaguar/PV-Jaguar-InJungle-WaterMirror.jpg

Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) stand taller than leopards and jaguars, but are slender and lightly-built as they are built for speed. The legs and tail are long, and the head is small and rounded, with a distinctive black ‘tear-mark’ running from the inner corner of each eye to the corner of the mouth (these are a good way of telling cheetahs from leopards or jaguars if you can’t tell from the body-shape). The spots are small and solid black. Cheetahs are found in Africa, with a small relict population (only around 50 animals) in Iran.

Cheetah image:
http://www.persiancarpetguide.com/sw-asia/Islamic/Mughal/images/Asiatic_Cheetah.jpg

There is no actual species called a panther, it’s just the name commonly used for melanistic leopards – that is, leopards with an excess of the dark pigment melanin, resulting in an almost entirely black coat (the markings still show up against the background in the right light). Some people also refer to melanistic jaguars as panthers, though the term originally applied only to black leopards.

Here’s an image of a melanistic leopard:
http://www.dkimages.com/discover/previews/884/25052695.JPG

And here’s a melanistic jaguar:
http://dinets.travel.ru/bjaguarmexl.jpg

The pumas (Puma concolor) – also called cougars, mountain lions, etc. – found in Florida are often called Florida panthers, which can cause confusion. These animals are NOT black – pumas are usually golden-brown, though they can range from nearly grey to nearly red. Melanism is possible in any species, but it is extremely rare in pumas. Pumas can reach slightly greater size than leopards, up to around 230lb. They are found throughout North, Central and South America, though obviously only those in Florida are referred to as Florida panthers – these are considered by some to be a unique and highly endangered subspecies, but recent genetic evidence suggests they may not be different enough from other pumas to be awarded subspecific status, which could have a negative effect on their conservation.

Here’s an image of a Florida panther:
http://www.flheritage.com/facts/symbols/images/symbols/panther.jpg

Charles asks…

Are there still jungles in South Africa?

I know there are still a good number of tribal peoples in South Africa, but are there any jungles left in Africa, or are they all gone (I hope not)?

admin answers:

South Africa is in a process of removing trees that belong to rain forests; and other tall growing trees.
We totally ignore the fact of global warming, and the need for trees at this stage, because we are very concerned about the rapid loss of fynbos, (Indigenous vegetation of the Cape) which are more shrubbery than tall. It used to be indigenous to South Africa before global warming and urbanization.
Nature conservation is ‘big’ here and we are trying to preserve the ‘big five’ (Animals) and other indigenous nature.
South Africa has a number of wonderful game farms and reserves.

Bush (forests) are no longer safe to visit because of the informal settlements in them and the high crime rate and people being robbed in non public places.

Visitors are advised to visit designated, protected game and nature reservations.
South Africa is still one of the most beautiful places on the earth. It is a wonderful place for artists to visit and the colors in nature are very sharp; not as sharp as in England but much sharper as in Brisbane for instance.

So to answer your question the answer is yes, but we call our jungles ‘bosveld’ or bush lands because the trees are not as high and dense.
We do have plantations with high trees. Lots of mountains and valleys too but our water ways are becoming a bit polluted.

Visit the Kruger National park and Table Mountain in Cape Town as well as Cape point to get a feel of what this country has to offer.

Please never buy products produced by poaching our wild animals like rhino horn and ivory.

Carol asks…

what exactly is a panther and how is it categorized?

is a panther its own separate species like a leopard or a jaguar or is it a sup species of leopards or jaguars or is it species called a cougar can some1 explain this to me

admin answers:

There is no actual species called a panther, it’s just the name commonly used for melanistic leopards – that is, leopards with an excess of the dark pigment melanin, resulting in an almost entirely black coat (the markings still show up against the background in the right light). Leopards (Panthera pardus) are found in Asia and Africa, with black individuals being the most common in the jungles of south-east Asia, perhaps because being black is less of a disadvantage here. Leopards are the fifth largest members of the cat family, weighing up to 200lb. They are excellent climbers and often take their kills into trees to keep them out of reach of other predators. In comparison with jaguars, they are smaller and more lightly-built, with proportionally longer legs and tail and a narrower head. Their spots are arranged in small rings.

Here’s an image of a normally-coloured leopard:
http://workstreaminc.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/08/29/leopard.jpg

And here’s a melanistic one (a panther):
http://www.dkimages.com/discover/previews/884/25052695.JPG

Some people also refer to melanistic jaguars as panthers, though the term originally applied only to black leopards. Jaguars (Panthera onca) are the third largest cats, weighing a maximum of 350lb. They are found in South and Central America (recently a few individuals have even been caught on camera-traps in the extreme southern US). They love water and often hunt fish and turtles. Jaguars are bigger and more heavily-built than leopards, with proportionately shorter legs and tail and a broader head. The spots are arranged in large, blotchy rosettes.

Here’s an image of a normally-coloured jaguar:
http://animals.timduru.org/dirlist/jaguar/PV-Jaguar-InJungle-WaterMirror.jpg

And here’s a melanistic one:
http://dinets.travel.ru/bjaguarmexl.jpg

‘Panther’ should not be confused with ‘Florida panther’. Florida panther is the name often given to the pumas (also called cougars, mountain lions, catamounts, etc.) found in Florida. These animals are NOT black – pumas (Puma concolor) are usually golden-brown, though they can range from nearly grey to nearly red. Melanism is possible in any species, but it is extremely rare in pumas. Pumas can reach slightly greater size than leopards, up to around 230lb. They are found throughout North, Central and South America, though obviously only those in Florida are referred to as Florida panthers – these are considered by some to be a unique and highly endangered subspecies, but recent genetic evidence suggests they may not be different enough from other pumas to be awarded subspecific status, which could have a negative effect on their conservation.

Here’s an image of a Florida panther:
http://www.flheritage.com/facts/symbols/images/symbols/panther.jpg

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